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Sustainable & low budget merge in these adaptive re-use homes

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Close-up view of reuse of existing brickwork and exterior cladding
Distant view of this adaptive re-use homes in Blackburn, Victoria
Small reading area with an open sliding glass door

The Salisbury Townhouses, designed by NTF Architecture are an adaptive re-use homes project that has merged sustainably driven design with low budget housing. The site in Blackburn, Victoria originally consisted of six 50sqm one bedroom units which were retained and reconfigured. The new homes now contain a kitchen, dining and living spaces and a second level was added to house two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a study space.

New large expanses of glazing were installed to provide ample natural light and views to the previously dark ground floor spaces.

A timber floor in the dining area with a wooden dining set and a painting on the wall
Black theme kitchen with a timber dining set next to it

The compact, and highly considered living spaces serve as a model for smaller footprint living and as a way to make use of outdated housing stock. We first need to consider whether we can re-use a site before it gets knocked down.

Affordability was a key consideration for this project, in both the building process and for the end user. Retaining and building atop the existing one bedroom units saw a great reduction in building costs as well as a reduction in building waste.

Did you know that the Australian construction industry makes a staggering 20 million tonnes of waste each year? Approximately 6 million tonnes of this goes into landfill and the rest is either recycled, illegally dumped, reused, reprocessed or stockpiled. Typically the waste includes bricks, concrete, metal, timber, plasterboard, asphalt, rock and soil.

Entrance to the Salisbury Townhouses by NTF Architecture with reuse existing brickwork
Close-up view of reuse of existing brickwork and exterior cladding from adaptive re-use homes
Hallway of the Salisbury Townhouses

Sustainability specs:
– Adaptive re-use homes constructed using existing dwellings reduced building waste
– Reuse of existing brickwork
– High performance glazing
– High performance wall, floor and ceiling insulation
– Use of natural ventilation
– Ample natural light lessens use of artificial lighting

Exterior reuse brickwork in the entrance to each Salisbury Townhouse
Close-up view of reuse of existing brickwork and exterior cladding
Entrance exterior view of the Salisbury townhouse with glass walls
Entrance door of adaptive re-use homes in Blackburn, Victoria with glass walls
Hallway view of Salisbury Townhouses
From the architect:

Our challenge was to provide an articulated outcome that would sit comfortably in a very suburban context. Materials were chosen for their textural qualities, and skillion roofs used as part of the project ‘fitting in’ to the neighbourhood context.

The resulting built forms consist of predominantly sheer two-storey walls that retain the existing brickwork from the original dwellings. Texture and colour became important devices, providing linking elements between the ground and first floor, tying these old and new elements together.

Images courtesy of NTF Architecture. Photography by Dave Kulesza.
Via www.thelocalproject.com.au
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